new photo blog

i started this blog in 2006, and it's shifted along with my interests through the years. it's been witness to a lot of learning for me...

still, i feel that i need a home for my photography -- so from now on, i'll be posting my pictures on the journal on my reworked website. if you like my photos, you might decide to follow me there!

my first post is here -- check it out!

as for this blog, i'm not sure what will happen. i don't think i'm willing to let it go, and certainly i'll keep it as an archive, but i need some time to figure it out.

for those of you that pop in from time to time, thanks for the visits and encouragement.


Thursday, January 26, 2012

photoshop quick tips: mysterious masks

like it?



want more tips? make a suggestion!

5 comments:

  1. That was extremely clear.  Excellent use of multimedia technology.  THank you.  You're a great teacher.  One question I have that your tutorial didn't quite answer is how you brush *precisely* to the edge of the region you want to mask.  Or how you can use marquee, lasso and maging wand tools to select regions to mask.  

    May I also ask for a tutorial on how you apply a gradient to all or part of an image please?  I presume you use a gradient fill layer or a gradient map adjustment layer, but I don't know which or how.

    Happy Australia Day, btw.

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  2. thanks, rodney.

    selection methods are another subject, and i'll get to them.
    question:  what do you want to use the gradient for? 

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  3. Um, I'd mostly like to use brightness gradients, to simulate the use of graduated ND filters, to make the background sky darker while leaving the foreground unchanged.

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  4. ok -- that's a good one. i'll do one for those... thanks!
    oh and yeah, happy oz day!

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  5. manozezez27/1/12 21:20

    You have a nice teaching voice. The audio sounds very compressed though.
    I'd be interested in tips about using the histogram to be sure prints will come out looking right in terms of exposure and contrast, especially if you're unsure if your monitor is calibrated properly.

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